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DNA hypermethylation within TERT promoter upregulates TERT expression in cancer.

This looks relevant to addressing the ability of many cancers to achieve replicative immortality. This group found that a "TERT hypermethylated oncological region" (a.k.a. "THOR") is immediately upstream of the TERT core promoter, and is hypermethylated in 9 of 11 tumor types they screened. This hypermethylation apparently bypasses the repressive function of the TERT core promoter. They also said that "THOR hypermethylation, independently or alone, accounted for how approximately 90% of human cancers can aberrantly activate telomerase". With regard to WILT, could de-methylating this hypermethylation of 52 CpG sites (THOR) be a relatively simple target for deactivating telomerase in human cancers, while not disturbing the core TERT promoter or the TERT gene itself?
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Somatic mutant clones colonize the human esophagus with age.

This looks like an interesting report of the accumulation of nuclear DNA mutants in human esophageal epithelium. This group found that somatic mutations accumulated during human aging in this tissue, with "a strong positive selection of clones carrying mutations in 14 cancer genes", with mutations in NOTCH1 and TP53 having relatively high prevalence (even higher than the rates found in esophageal cancers). These results make me wonder about the dynamics of cancer-related gene mutations during human aging. I wonder whether the age-related increase in cancer incidence is caused by the metabolic-abuse-area-under-the-curve associated with a longer time alive (living longer = more damage), or whether there is some positive selection process for cancer-associated gene mutations, or maybe the increased cancer incidence is caused mostly by a decline in immune function, or perhaps the explanation varies by cancer type.
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Identification of a novel gene fusion in ALT positive osteosarcoma.

This group reports on an apparently novel gene fusion between DAXX and KIFC3 in an ALT-positive osteosarcoma cell line. They found that this fusion caused DAXX dysfunction that was "likely promoting ALT activity". I leave it to other researchers on this distribution list to study the details and determine whether the DAXX dysfunction from this gene fusion might be a primary cause of ALT activity in ALT-positive cancers more broadly. If it is, perhaps there is some way to target cells possessing this fusion (to edit the fusion in their DNA or destroy them).
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ATRX loss induces multiple hallmarks of the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) phenotype in human glioma cell lines in a cell line-specific manner.

Over the years, I've reported several times on papers showing an association between loss of ATRX and ALT activity. This group reports that by loss of ATRX, they could induce what appeared to be ALT activity in two of four human glioma cell lines they tested. However, telomerase activity, telomere length, and telomere length homogeneity were not affected by this loss.
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Distributed hepatocytes expressing telomerase repopulate the liver in homeostasis and injury.

This looks like a sufficiently interesting biology lesson that I thought I should include it in this report. This group reports that a small subset of hepatocytes apparently express high levels of telomerase, and these are the cells that may be involved in rejuvenation in response to liver injury. This might have implications for WILT, especially if these high-TERT-expressing hepatocytes are not stem cells that can simply be replenished periodically.
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Free report on high blood pressure

The American Heart Association estimates more than 100 million Americans have high blood pressure, also known as “hypertension”. Learn more about the cause of high blood pressure and how you can reverse it in our free report.

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Biomarker levels predict the risk of early death—and we can change them! Learn about some important longevity biomarkers in our free report.

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An estimated 50% of American adults have either prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Learn more about the cause of type 2 diabetes, prediabetes, insulin resistance, and how to reverse them in our free report.

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