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CMV immune evasion and manipulation of the immune system with aging.


Maximus Peto’s Commentary

These researchers outline some of what seems to be the most critical questions in CMV research as it relates to human aging. They mention in the abstract that this is a meeting report. I scanned the full-text and it looks like an interesting read, though it may not offer much new to people very familiar with the state-of-the-art in this field.


CMV immune evasion and manipulation of the immune system with aging.
Geroscience. 2017 Jun;39(3):273-291.
Jackson SE, Redeker A, Arens R, van Baarle D, van den Berg SPH, Benedict CA, Čičin-Šain L, Hill AB, Wills MR
DOI: 10.1007/s11357-017-9986-6
PubMed publication date (edat): 6/26/2017

Abstract

Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes numerous proteins and microRNAs that function to evade the immune response and allow the virus to replicate and disseminate in the face of a competent innate and acquired immune system. The establishment of a latent infection by CMV, which if completely quiescent at the level of viral gene expression would represent an ultimate in immune evasion strategies, is not sufficient for lifelong persistence and dissemination of the virus. CMV needs to reactivate and replicate in a lytic cycle of infection in order to disseminate further, which occurs in the face of a fully primed secondary immune response. Without reactivation, latency itself would be redundant for the virus. It is also becoming clear that latency is not a totally quiescent state, but is characterized by limited viral gene expression. Therefore, the virus also needs immune evasion strategies during latency. An effective immune response to CMV is required or viral replication will cause morbidity and ultimately mortality in the host. There is clearly a complex balance between virus immune evasion and host immune recognition over a lifetime. This poses the important question of whether long-term evasion or manipulation of the immune response driven by CMV is detrimental to health. In this meeting report, three groups used the murine model of CMV (MCMV) to examine if the contribution of the virus to immune senescence is set by the (i) initial viral inoculum, (ii) inflation of T cell responses, (iii) or the balance between functionally distinct effector CD4+ T cells. The work of other groups studying the CMV response in humans is discussed. Their work asks whether the ability to make immune responses to new antigens is compromised by (i) age and HCMV carriage, (ii) long-term exposure to HCMV giving rise to an overall immunosuppressive environment and increased levels of latent virus, or (iii) adapted virus mutants (used as potential vaccines) that have the capacity to elicit conventional and unconventional T cell responses.

PMID: 28647908
Free Full-Text: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5505894/

Maximus Peto

Max Peto is a longevity researcher and founder of Long Life Labs. A biochemist by training, he studies the biochemistry of aging and longevity and has worked with research organizations such as SENS Research Foundation, Methuselah Foundation, BioAge Labs, Life Extension Foundation, and Ichor Therapeutics. His work at Long Life Labs is focused on empowering people to understand and manage the most critical factors for better health and longer life.

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