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CMV-Specific T-cell Responses at Older Ages: Broad Responses With a Large Central Memory Component May Be Key to Long-term Survival.


Maximus Peto’s Commentary

These researchers report on their characterization of responses of T-cell from older people. T-cell response was induced in vitro. They note that the oldest old group apparently recognized more proteins, and had “bigger” T-cell responses than some other groups.


CMV-Specific T-cell Responses at Older Ages: Broad Responses With a Large Central Memory Component May Be Key to Long-term Survival.
J Infect Dis. 2017 Apr 15;215(8):1212-1220.
Bajwa M, Vita S, Vescovini R, Larsen M, Sansoni P, Terrazzini N, Caserta S, Thomas D, Davies KA, Smith H, Kern F
DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jix080
PubMed publication date (edat): 2/16/2017

Abstract

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection sometimes causes large expansions of CMV-specific T cells, particularly in older people. This is believed to undermine immunity to other pathogens and to accelerate immunosenescence. While multiple different CMV proteins are recognized, most publications on age-related T-cell expansions have focused on dominant target proteins UL83 or UL123, and the T-cell activation marker interferon-γ (IFN-γ). We were concerned that this narrow approach might have skewed our understanding of CMV-specific immunity at older ages. We have, therefore, widened the scope of analysis to include in vitro-induced T-cell responses to 19 frequently recognized CMV proteins in “young” and “older” healthy volunteers and a group of “oldest old” long-term survivors (>85 years of age). Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to analyze T-cell activation markers (CD107, CD154, interleukin-2 [IL-2], tumor necrosis factor [TNF], and IFN-γ) and memory phenotypes (CD27, CD45RA). The older group had, on average, larger T-cell responses than the young, but, interestingly, response size differences were relatively smaller when all activation markers were considered rather than IFN-γ or TNF alone. The oldest old group recognized more proteins on average than the other groups, and had even bigger T-cell responses than the older group with a significantly larger central memory CD4 T-cell component.

PMID: 28199648
Free Full-Text: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5854018/

Maximus Peto

Max Peto is a longevity researcher and founder of Long Life Labs. A biochemist by training, he studies the biochemistry of aging and longevity and has worked with research organizations such as SENS Research Foundation, Methuselah Foundation, BioAge Labs, Life Extension Foundation, and Ichor Therapeutics. His work at Long Life Labs is focused on empowering people to understand and manage the most critical factors for better health and longer life.

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