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Small molecule nicotinamide N-methyltransferase inhibitor activates senescent muscle stem cells and improves regenerative capacity of aged skeletal muscle.

This looks like some remarkable regenerative effects caused by inhibiting an enzyme that is increased in aging and impairs NAD+ salvage. In the treatment group, the response to muscle injury seemed considerably increased: "muscle stem cell proliferation and fusion were elevated, supporting nearly 2-fold greater cross-sectional area and shifts in fiber size distribution; prolonged treatment post-injury further augmented myofiber regeneration evidenced by increasingly larger fiber cross-sectional area". Apparently the activity of this enzyme that impairs NAD+ salvage (NNMT) increases with age, so I presume it may be a contributor to the age-related decline in NAD+. I wonder why it increases with age in the first place.
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Distributed hepatocytes expressing telomerase repopulate the liver in homeostasis and injury.

This looks like a sufficiently interesting biology lesson that I thought I should include it in this report. This group reports that a small subset of hepatocytes apparently express high levels of telomerase, and these are the cells that may be involved in rejuvenation in response to liver injury. This might have implications for WILT, especially if these high-TERT-expressing hepatocytes are not stem cells that can simply be replenished periodically.
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Acellular therapeutic approach for heart failure: in vitro production of extracellular vesicles from human cardiovascular progenitors.

These look like remarkable results in nude mice. This group used extracellular vesicles from human, iPSC cardiovascular progenitors. They injected them into nude mice 3 weeks after induced heart attack. They report that this treatment improved multiple parameters of heart function, including left ventricular ejection fraction. Markers of cell survival and proliferation were increased. Could this be useful for humans with heart disease (or age-related cardiac dysfunction)?
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Clinical implications of myelin regeneration in the central nervous system.

I recently reported on a paper that observed myelin being positively associated with processing speed in humans (PMID 29274747). The authors of the current publication review diseases that compromise myelin, and endogenous capacity for myelin regeneration. Could myelin regeneration be part of a necessary panel of SENSible medical interventions for aging humans?
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The Impact of Aging on Mechanisms of Mammalian Epimorphic Regeneration.

This looks relevant to an AgeX project to enhance human regenerative capability I've heard about. I am concerned about the accumulation of microstructural damage during aging that may not be restored properly, and am curious to know whether enhancement of this type of regenerative capability might have a greater positive effect on physiological function and lifespan than we might have guessed.
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Lens regeneration using endogenous stem cells with gain of visual function.

This appears to be a remarkable report: regeneration of lens visual function in human infants with cataracts. The methods are not clear from the abstract; I'm very curious about the experiments in human infants. If cataracts can be reversed without a "cleanup-protocol", it suggests that the accumulation of aggregates is not the cause of cataracts.
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Free report on high blood pressure

The American Heart Association estimates more than 100 million Americans have high blood pressure, also known as “hypertension”. Learn more about the cause of high blood pressure and how you can reverse it in our free report.

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Free longevity biomarker report

Biomarker levels predict the risk of early death—and we can change them! Learn about some important longevity biomarkers in our free report.

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Free diabetes report

An estimated 50% of American adults have either prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Learn more about the cause of type 2 diabetes, prediabetes, insulin resistance, and how to reverse them in our free report.

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