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Microfluidic reprogramming to pluripotency of human somatic cells.

This may not be of direct interest to us, but the apparent technological and economic implications of this report seem noteworthy and relevant enough for us to know about. This group reports using microfluidics systems to manufacture human induced pluripotent stem cells ("hiPSCs") in xeno-free, defined conditions, using only 20 uL of growth medium per day, resulting in an "~100-fold reduction in costs of raw materials compared to those for standard multiwell culture conditions". This seems like a remarkable advancement.
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Nonviral ultrasound-mediated gene delivery in small and large animal models.

I haven't heard of this method of gene delivery before. This is a methods paper about how to use ultrasound imaging to deliver genes to whole animals (mice and pigs) "within 10 minutes". While potentially interesting for whole-human gene therapy, I also retained this paper in case some researchers might use this in cell transfection (e.g. instead of viral or chemical transfection), though I didn't look into the full-text to see how efficient this method is.
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Highly Purified Human Extracellular Vesicles Produced by Stem Cells Alleviate Aging Cellular Phenotypes of Senescent Human Cells.

This seems related to parabiosis, insofar as one influential aspect of parabiosis might be derived from signaling molecules in the blood. This group compares extracellular vesicles ("EVs") derived from MSC and iPSC and find that iPSCs could "produce 16-fold more EVs than MSCs". Moreover, when applied to senescent MSCs in cell culture, these EVs from iPSCs could "reduce cellular ROS levels and alleviate aging phenotypes of senescent MSCs."
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Cells exhibiting strong p16 INK4a promoter activation in vivo display features of senescence.

This group reports on a "knock-in fluorochrome", tandem dimer Tomato, for assessing the prevalence of senescent cells in the whole, live organism (in mice). This fluorochrome was apparently better at assessing p16INK4a promoter activation than mRNA abundance. I wonder what method they used to visualize the increase in p16INK4a promoter activation with aging (e.g. biopsy and fluorescence microscopy? Something else?) If it was not particularly invasive or toxic, perhaps it would be useful for the evaluation of promising medical interventions in aging humans.
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Free report on high blood pressure

The American Heart Association estimates more than 100 million Americans have high blood pressure, also known as “hypertension”. Learn more about the cause of high blood pressure and how you can reverse it in our free report.

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Free longevity biomarker report

Biomarker levels predict the risk of early death—and we can change them! Learn about some important longevity biomarkers in our free report.

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Free diabetes report

An estimated 50% of American adults have either prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Learn more about the cause of type 2 diabetes, prediabetes, insulin resistance, and how to reverse them in our free report.

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