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Impaired immune surveillance accelerates accumulation of senescent cells and aging.

I have recently considered the possibility that senescent cells may appear to accumulate during aging because the damage that induces senescence is not repaired as fast as it is created (as it may once have been in relative youth). On the question of why there is a higher prevalence of senescent cells during aging, this group reports that impaired immunity (cell cytotoxicity, specifically) is associated with an increase in senescent cell prevalence. In a mouse model of impaired cell cytotoxicity in immune function, this increased senescent cell burden was associated with lower survival, higher chronic inflammation, and multiple age-related disorders--*and*--senescent cell ablation with ABT-737 "partially alleviates" these. They also report on some interesting results in progeroid (lamin A mutant) mice, where senescent cell ablation in the second half of life extends median lifespan.
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Lymph nodes as barriers to T-cell rejuvenation in aging mice and nonhuman primates.

I don't know enough about the lymph nodes, spleen, and secondary lymphoid organs to be writing intelligently about them here, but if I understand this correctly, it sounds like age-related fibrosis and dysfunction in these secondary lymphoid organs (especially the lymph nodes) can prevent migration of recent thymic emigrants from a rejuvenated thymus (in mice). This makes me concerned that perhaps the transport and housing system for T-cells (e.g. spleen and lymph system) might need to be rejuvenated for a rejuvenated thymus to be of maximal benefit.
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Human umbilical cord blood plasma alleviates age-related olfactory dysfunction by attenuating peripheral TNF-α expression.

I'm not sure how much weight should be given to a change in the results of a "food finding test" in mice. But this group administered human cord blood-derived plasma to mice older than 24 months, and found that it was associated with an apparent improvement in age-related olfactory dysfunction (as assessed with this "food finding test"). This effect of cord blood-derived plasma seems to have some relation to parabiosis studies.
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The antimicrobial protection hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease.

Here, this group proposes the "Antimicrobial Protection Hypothesis" of Alzheimer's, which explains that Abeta production and fibrillization "drives neuroinflammatory path ways that help fight the infection", but chronic activation of this pathway causes sustained inflammation and neurodegeneration, thus explaining the links between infections and Abeta, and Abeta and Alzheimer's.
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Free report on high blood pressure

The American Heart Association estimates more than 100 million Americans have high blood pressure, also known as “hypertension”. Learn more about the cause of high blood pressure and how you can reverse it in our free report.

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Biomarker levels predict the risk of early death—and we can change them! Learn about some important longevity biomarkers in our free report.

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An estimated 50% of American adults have either prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Learn more about the cause of type 2 diabetes, prediabetes, insulin resistance, and how to reverse them in our free report.

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