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Synchrony and asynchrony between an epigenetic clock and developmental timing.

This group reports that epigenetic aging "clocks" highly correlate with chronological age even during fetal development (as assessed by epigenetic age of fetal retina). This seems to support the concept that some epigenetic changes are highly regular and predictable during development (extending observations of this phenomenon throughout the lifespan after birth). They also note that these epigenetic changes are apparently accelerated in Down syndrome.
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Age-dependent DNA methylation patterns on the Y chromosome in elderly males.

Given that women tend to live longer than men, and methylation patterns seem to be measuring some consistent age-related processes, I thought this study of DNA methylation patterns on the Y chromosome might be interesting. Interestingly, they concluded that the predominant, age-dependent, DNA methylation patterns on the Y chromosome were associated with a *reduced* risk of death.
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Cell and tissue type independent age-associated DNA methylation changes are not rare but common.

This group reports on what seems to be an important finding: that "possibly over 70% of epigenetic 'drift' is shared between significant numbers of different tissue and cell types". To me, this seems to suggest that many (most?) age-related changes in gene expression (or at least changes in CpG methylation status) are programmed or somehow tightly regulated. If they weren't, how could so many different tissues end up with very similar CpG methylation patterns during aging? Am I missing something here?
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A multi-tissue full lifespan epigenetic clock for mice.

This group reports on a seemingly important aspect of different "epigenetic clocks": they vary in their ability to detect the effects of anti-aging interventions such as calorie restriction and growth hormone receptor knockout. The most accurate clocks (the ones that are closest to chronological age) are not the best for detecting the changes caused by these anti-aging interventions.
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Free report on high blood pressure

The American Heart Association estimates more than 100 million Americans have high blood pressure, also known as “hypertension”. Learn more about the cause of high blood pressure and how you can reverse it in our free report.

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Free longevity biomarker report

Biomarker levels predict the risk of early death—and we can change them! Learn about some important longevity biomarkers in our free report.

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Free diabetes report

An estimated 50% of American adults have either prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Learn more about the cause of type 2 diabetes, prediabetes, insulin resistance, and how to reverse them in our free report.

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