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Vascular smooth muscle cell loss underpins the accelerated atherosclerosis in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

I only retained this paper because they noted that progeria (HGPS) is characterized by "a severe loss of vascular smooth muscle cells". Mouse models of progeria don't have this loss, and they also don't develop atherosclerosis. So I wonder: is normal human aging characterized by "a severe loss of vascular smooth muscle cells"? If so, based on this study, perhaps it could be a contributing factor in the development of atherosclerosis in humans.
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Red Blood Cell Distribution Width, Vascular Aging Biomarkers, and Endothelial Progenitor Cells for Predicting Vascular Aging and Diagnosing/Prognosing Age-Related Degenerative Arterial Diseases.

I normally wouldn't have included this paper in my reporting because it was not clear in the abstract exactly how good of a predictor of cardiovascular disease RDW was observed in this study. But since it was published in Rejuvenation Research , I retained it in this report for readers to investigate further.
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Occurrence and characterization of lipofuscin and ceroid in human atherosclerotic plaque.

This report appears to be a review of the prevalence of lipofuscin and ceroid in and around atherosclerotic plaque in humans. Interestingly, in a quick search about ceroid, I found a report of statin administration enhancing lipofuscin accumulation in the livers of animals. I wonder whether some findings of lipofuscin and ceroid may be confounded by the fairly widespread use of statins in older humans.
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Platelet membrane-coated nanoparticle-mediated targeting delivery of Rapamycin blocks atherosclerotic plaque development and stabilizes plaque in apolipoprotein E-deficient  (ApoE-/-) mice.

This research group claimed that "rapamycin features potent anti-atherosclerosis effect", which I've heard something of in the scientific literature, but not enough to be confident about it (I haven't done a deep dive yet, so maybe the evidence is there and I just haven't seen it yet). These researchers used "platelet membrane-coated nanoparticles" to deliver rapamycin to atherosclerotic plaques in ApoE -/- mice, and found the particles to home to atherosclerotic plaques better than control nanoparticles. Moreover, they report that these particles "significantly attenuated the progression of atherosclerosis and stabilized atherosclerotic plaques". I wonder whether this technique (if only the targeting technique, if not the rapamycin) might be useful for reversing human atherosclerosis.
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Free report on high blood pressure

The American Heart Association estimates more than 100 million Americans have high blood pressure, also known as “hypertension”. Learn more about the cause of high blood pressure and how you can reverse it in our free report.

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Biomarker levels predict the risk of early death—and we can change them! Learn about some important longevity biomarkers in our free report.

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An estimated 50% of American adults have either prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Learn more about the cause of type 2 diabetes, prediabetes, insulin resistance, and how to reverse them in our free report.

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