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Lifespan Changes of the Human Brain In Alzheimer’s Disease.

This study looks potentially useful for identifying Alzhiemer's disease development very early in the pathological process. This group analyzed "a massive number of MRI (N = 4329)" of humans of different ages, including control, Alzheimer's, and mild cognitive impairment subjects. They found early divergences between normal brain aging and Alzheimer's brains that occurred as early as before age 40 (in the hippocampus) and around age 40 (for the lateral ventricle and amygdala). I wonder if this information might be used to identify candidates for early interventions in the pathological process for Alzheimer's.
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Quiescence Modulates Stem Cell Maintenance and Regenerative Capacity in the Aging Brain.

Unfortunately, this study was done in mice, but interestingly, they report "a dramatic drop in the neural stem cells (NSC) number in the aging...brain". They also found that the remaining NSCs had a tendency toward quiescence, making them resistant to divide to regenerate the brain. I wonder whether these changes occur in aged humans and whether increasing the number of these cells would have rejuvenating effects in aged humans.
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An early-senescence state in aged mesenchymal stromal cells contributes to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell clonogenic impairment through the activation of a pro-inflammatory program.

This group characterized mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from the bone marrow of humans of different ages and found older MSC to have many concerning characteristics, including senescent-like (enlarged) morphology, reduced proliferation ability, increased SA-beta-galactosidase, increased lipofuscin, and increased DNA damage and DNA damage response. Exposure of young hematopoetic stem cells to factors secreted by aged MSC impaired some aspects of their function.
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Lack of muscle fibre hypertrophy, myonuclear addition, and satellite cell pool expansion with resistance training in 83-94-year-old men and women.

If I recall correctly, I have heard some researchers suggest that sarcopenia can be completely avoided (or even successfully treated) with sufficient exercise and nutrition interventions. It's not clear whether this research group provided adequate nutritional intervention, but they reported that "12 weeks of heavy resistance training" was not sufficient to improve some muscle parameters in older men and women. To me, these results support the idea that age-related sarcopenia and frailty are caused by something other than inadequate exercise and nutrition.
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Free report on high blood pressure

The American Heart Association estimates more than 100 million Americans have high blood pressure, also known as “hypertension”. Learn more about the cause of high blood pressure and how you can reverse it in our free report.

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Free longevity biomarker report

Biomarker levels predict the risk of early death—and we can change them! Learn about some important longevity biomarkers in our free report.

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Free diabetes report

An estimated 50% of American adults have either prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Learn more about the cause of type 2 diabetes, prediabetes, insulin resistance, and how to reverse them in our free report.

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